January Book Log

February 3, 2018

Well, it’s probably not a good thing that I’ve already failed at one of my 2018 reading goals. I didn’t read a book over 400 pages this month, but I’ll finish a 550 page book this weekend and then attempt to make up for my shortcomings as the rest of the month progresses. Anyway…

  1. The Origins of Creativity by E.O. Wilson (4/5) – This is an interesting look at creativity from the perspective of a well-regarded scientist and thinker. It also contains the best Franzen burn I’ve ever seen in print. It is not an entirely focused work, but it is very interesting and provides plenty for food for thought.
  2. The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bugkov (5/5) – It took me forever to read this novel. I think I started it back in November. But it was fantastic. Not, obviously, a quick read, but it exists in what is – for me – a delightful space somewhere between Tolstoy and Nabokov. I am not at all certain exactly what it means or is trying to say (neither, from what I’ve found on the internet, are most people) other than it is clearly opposed to the intellectual restrictions of Soviet-style communism. But I very much enjoyed the ride.
  3. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery (5/5) – Maybe shouldn’t even count this. But I got a fancy copy of it and read it (along with the commentary volume) and it was as moving as it has always been when I’ve read it and ended with me crying and searching for my children to hug. If you haven’t ever read this, dear lord, sit down with it and make that happen. It won’t take long.
  4. Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders (4/5) – This was The Book from last year. I liked it pretty well and I understand why other people love it. The whole subject matter of the supposed afterlife and what it’s like is one I’m a bit tired of as a reader, but that’s hardly Saunders’ fault. In any case, the story telling is interesting and the book is an easy read.
  5. Hamlet by William Shakespeare (5/5) – Teaching it for the first time in a while. I do always enjoy all of the reminders this gives me of how often we quote Shakespeare without thinking about it.

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