March Book Log

April 1, 2018

I continue to truck along with the only real difficulty being making sure I finish a long book every month. As was the case with January, I’m nearing the end of my long book (The Worst Journey in the World) but not quite there. Otherwise, it was an incredibly pleasing month of reading with one exception.

  1. The Golden Cockerel and Other Writing by Juan Rulfo (5/5) – There is a blurb on the back of my copy of this book where Gabriel Garcia-Marquez essentially gives Rulfo credit for his own writing. I don’t know that there could be a stronger endorsement. And the connection is clear. This is very much proto-Garcia-Marquez and it is uniformly brilliant all the way through.
  2. Playing in the Dark by Toni Morrison (5/5) – Morrison mentioned this volume in an interview I watched while prepping to teach¬†Jazz earlier this year, and I was intrigued. It’s a scholarly look at the way white American writers have dealt with blackness in the their novels. Really interesting and convincing work by a brilliant writer and thinker.
  3. The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride (5/5) – McBride’s first novel¬†A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing was a work of genius that was also nearly impenetrable. This novel is no less brilliant, but much more accessible as it gives a stream-of-consciousness account of romance between well drawn and complex characters. I definitely expect it to be on my end of year list. I can’t recommend it highly enough.
  4. The Nagano Thrift Shop by Hiromi Kawakami (2.5/5) – Meh. There is nothing wrong with this book. Is well-written and I have no issues with any particular bits or passages, but I didn’t register a single feelings the entire time I was reading it. The characters aren’t much more than a collection of nervous ticks that try to stand in for human traits.
  5. The Things They Carried by Tim O’Brien (5/5) – I hadn’t read this in ages, but I’m teaching it, so a re-read was called for. This book is heavily chronicled at this point and if you haven’t read it, you should. O’Brien does the most honest job of writing about war of anyone I’ve read.
  6. Rumors of Light by Leslie Shane (5/5) – I was recently lucky enough to be given several editions from an Larkspur Press, which is an artisan book producer here in Kentucky. The books are gorgeous and this one, which is the first I’ve read, is excellent pastoral poetry. This kind of poetry often feels stale or empty but Shane finds new wrinkles and manages to play with the language without losing the mood or feel of a pastoral piece. Very well done.